•  *Math Enrichment: 3rd Grade*


    You can ALWAYS get on Clever, and choose Dreambox to practice your math skills at home.


    Check back frequently to find new games or videos that have been added or updated! :)


     3rd Grade Math Skill Games:

    Use the following to practice any of your 3rd grade math skills: multiplication, division, addition, rounding, fractions, area, time, bar graphs, line plots..etc..

    Math Playground: 3rd Grade Games

    *some of the games may not work due to having to have a "Premium" membership-- play the ones you can for free*


    Use the following to practice any of your 3rd grade math skills: counting, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, measurement, time, geometry, data, estimation and money

    Mathopolis: 3rd Grade Math Skills 


    Use the following to practice any of your 3rd grade math skills: counting, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, measurement, time, geometry, data, estimation and money

    Math is Fun! Curriculum


    Use the following to practice any of your 3rd grade math skills: parts of a whole, distributive property, understanding fractions, number line fractions and division practice.

    Starfall: Math Practice

    *some of the games may not work due to having to have a membership-- play the ones you can for free*


    Use the following website link to practice your multiplication facts!

    Mathigon: Multiply


    3rd Grade Math Games and Resources by Standard:

    Standard-> 3.OA.1: Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

    Farmer Albert Eggstein: Multiplication Problem Solving


    Standard-> 3.OA.2: Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

    Share with Llamacorn: Division Word Problems 


    Standard-> 3.OA.3: Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. 

    Balloon Pop: Problem Solving 


    Standard-> 3.OA.5: Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.

    Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication)

    Examples: 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication)

    Example: Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property)


    Standard-> 3.OA.9: Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using properties of operations.

    For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number can be decomposed into two equal addends.


    Standard-> 3.NBT.1: Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

                     


    Standard-> 3.NBT.2: Fluently add and subtract (including subtracting across zeros) within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. Include problems with whole dollar amounts.

    Roll and Score: Double Digit Addition 


    Standard-> 3.NBT.3: Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10–90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.


    Standard-> 3.MD.1: Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.

    Bedtime Bandits!

    Play the role of a boy or girl who aims to stay up as late as possible by shining a magic flashlight on the correct descending clock. Each round, ten clocks descend from the bedroom ceiling and students must eliminate them before they touch the ground by shining the flashlight on the clock that matches the analog prompt. For each clock eliminated, the bedtime increases by one minute. Each round becomes slightly harder than the last.


    Standard-> 3.MD.2: Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

     


    Standard-> 3.MD.3: Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs.  For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.

     


    Standard-> 3.MD.5: Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement.

    Online Area Quiz

    a. A square with side length 1 unit, called “a unit square,” is said to have “one square unit” of area, and can be used to measure area.

    b. A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an area of n square units.


    Standard-> 3.MD.6: Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units).

    Area (and perimeter) Interactive


    Standard-> 3.MD.7: Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition.

    a. Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths.

    b. Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side lengths (where factors can be between 1 and 10, inclusively) in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.

    c. Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole number side lengths a and b + c is the sum of a × b and a × c. Use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.

    d. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems. Recognize area as additive.


     Free Online Math Tools:

    Bridges Manipulatives.png

    (Click the picture to follow the link to The Math Learning Center.)

    Explore these online manipulatives.

    Click on "web app" to open and explore using the geoboard, number frame, number pieces, fractions, money pieces, clock, number line, number rack, math vocabulary cards and pattern pieces.